Born to Win, Schooled to Lose: Why Equally Talented Students Don’t Get Equal Chances to Be All They Can Be – Coverage by report

Born to Win, Schooled to Lose: Why Equally Talented Students Don’t Get Equal Chances to Be All They Can Be- Coverage by report.


White Workers Are More Likely than Black or Latino Americans to Have a Good Job — Even With the Same Level of Education

In this Marketwatch article, Quentin Fottrell discusses the racial disparity in who gets good jobs in today’s workforce. Fottrell cites new CEW release “The Unequal Race for Good Jobs” as well as “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose.” Fottrell also quotes CEW Director Anthony P. Carnevale.

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Rich Students Get Better SAT Scores—Here’s Why

In this CNBC article, Abigail Hess writes about how income plays a role when it comes to students’ SAT scores. Hess cites CEW report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose.”

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Can We Save the American Dream?

Heather E. McGowan writes in Forbes about how recent research, including the CEW report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose,” demonstrates the failure of the American Dream.

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Is Key to Success Being Born Smart or Rich?

In this article for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Maureen Downey writes about the role family income plays in students’ success. Downey cites CEW’s report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose” and quotes CEW Director Dr. Anthony P. Carnevale on how in the US, it is better to be born affluent than smart.

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Education as a Meritocracy? Report Finds It Is Still Better to Be Born Rich than Smart in US

Valerie Strauss writes in the Washington Post about the findings of CEW’s report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose.”

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Is It Better to Be Born Smart or Rich? You Probably Won’t Like the Answer.

In this Washington Post article, Helaine Olen writes about how education alone is not enough to reduce socioeconomic inequality. Olen cites CEW’s report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose.”

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Georgetown Study: ‘To Succeed in America, It’s Better to Be Born Rich Than Smart’

In this CNBC article, Abigail Hess writes about how students’ socioeconomic backgrounds affects their success. Hess cites CEW’s report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose” and quotes CEW Director Dr. Anthony P. Carnevale on the report’s findings.

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Robert Smith’s Real Gift to Morehouse

In this article for The Atlantic, Ibram X. Kendi discusses the impact of philanthropist Robert Smith’s gift to Morehouse College’s class of 2019—paying off their student debt. Kendi cites CEW’s report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose” and quotes CEW Director Dr. Anthony P. Carnevale.

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New Pell Institute Study Finds ‘Critical’ Gap in College Success Between Low- & High-Income Students. Here Are 3 Reasons for Hope

In this article for The 74, Richard Whitmire writes about the Pell Institute’s study on the disparities in success between students from disadvantaged and advantaged backgrounds, as well as developments that indicate positive change. Whitmire cites CEW’s report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose.”

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The Real Cost of School for First-Generation College Students

In this NBC article, Esta Pratt-Kielley writes about the costly barriers first-generation college students face besides tuition, including housing costs. Pratt-Kielley cites CEW’s report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose.”

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In America, It’s Better to Be Born Rich Than Smart

Richard Whitmire writes in this Hill op-ed about how poor, talented students do not succeed at the same rate as rich, less talented students. Whitmire cites CEW’s report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose” in arguing about what can be done to change this widespread inequity.

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Money Can’t Buy an End to Systemic Racism in Education

Esther Cepeda writes in this Chicago Tribune op-ed about the ways she believes money would fall short in addressing racial disparities in education. Cepeda cites the CEW report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose.”

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Report Notes Trends Related to Race, Class and Educational Attainment

In this Inside Higher Ed article, Scott Jaschik writes about the recent CEW report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose.” Jaschik highlights the finding that even disadvantaged, academically talented students have a lower chance of success than their less talented, advantaged peers.

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7 Out of 10 Wealthy Kindergarten Students With Low Test Scores Were Affluent by Age 25, Study Finds

Erin Richards writes in USA Today about how nature and nurture affect children’s academic and career outcomes. Richards covers the CEW report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose” and quotes CEW Director Anthony P. Carnevale.

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Money Over Shakespeare: Study Shows How Childhood Socioeconomic Status Determines Wealth in Adulthood

In this Education Week article, Sasha Jones writes about the CEW report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose.” Jones quotes CEW Director Anthony P. Carnevale on the growing role of higher education in the labor market.

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America’s Educational System Is an ‘Aristocracy Posing as a Meritocracy’

In this MarketWatch article, Jillian Berman explores whether the education system is a meritocracy. Berman cites the CEW report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose” and quotes CEW Director Anthony P. Carnevale, who explains how report findings show it more closely resembles an aristocracy.

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Georgetown Study Explores Privilege and Race in Educational Outcomes

Pearl Stewart writes in Diverse Issues in Higher Ed about how socioeconomic disparities are at play for students as early as in kindergarten. Stewart cites the CEW report “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose” and quotes CEW Assistant Research Professor and Research Economist Megan Fasules.

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