Blog

The Center on Education and the Workforce analyzes the link between education, career preparation, and workplace demands. Visit our LinkedIn page to see further commentary and blogs on related topics.


How to Advance Your Career by Working While in College

Pursuing higher education while working is a balancing act, but it is possible to use both to be positioned to succeed long after college.

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More of Today’s Manufacturing Workers Have Bachelor’s Degrees than Ever Before

Despite its decline, manufacturing has become more productive with the help of technology and more highly skilled workers.

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Celebrating Latinos’ Gains in Education and the Economy

Not only are more Latinos going to college, but more are completing their degrees. Despite this progress, however, Latinos still lag behind their peers in completing college.

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What If You Knew How Much Your College Program Will Cost—and How Much It Will Enable You to Earn?

Most people decide whether and where to go to college without knowing what they will pay and what they will get in return for their investment. Unbundling college data at the program level will result in a system that is more attuned to students’ needs.

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Why $1 Trillion Is the Magic Number for Infrastructure Spending

A $1 trillion infrastructure investment could create up to 11 million jobs—nearly as many as a $2 trillion investment, but for half the cost. With 55% of these new jobs going to workers with a high school education or less, the expenditure would temporarily revive the blue-collar economy.

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Can Women Close the Wage Gap through Educational Gains?

Women have made extraordinary strides in closing the gender wage gap. Education is their primary strategy for gaining access to the labor force and achieving economic prosperity. Since 1975, the gender wage gap has narrowed by 24 cents, and women’s participation in college has nearly doubled. The analysis suggests that the wage gap is 7 percent

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Our higher education system is split into unequal tracks divided by race: here’s why.

The promise of American higher education is to promote human flourishing and equal opportunities to students of all backgrounds. But what we see in today’s colleges is a far cry from a united path to prosperity—it’s a chasm demarcated by race. So, how did that promise become racially separate and unequal tracks? Beginning in the

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Thinking about college? Pay attention to these 5 rules

Now more than ever, postsecondary education is a key pathway to economic independence. Before the 1980s, two-thirds of jobs required a high school education or less. Now, the same share of jobs requires at least some college. But just as postsecondary education has become more valuable, it has also become more expensive. At four-year public

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Every year, half a million top-scoring students never get a college credential

Every year, 500,000 students graduate in the top half of their high school class, yet never get a college credential—not even a certificate. To put this into perspective, that’s five million lost youth every decade. These students have the skills to graduate with a bachelor’s degree. They would even have a higher than 80 percent

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Latinos: Moving Forward toward a Promising Future

As we near the end of Hispanic Heritage month, we’re reflecting on Latinos’ contributions to American culture and the economy. Latinos have made significant strides in educational attainment and workforce participation. Their high school graduation rates are up and growing and their postsecondary attainment rate has increased from 35 to 45 percent since 1992. But, compared

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Nursing: an oasis of opportunity

The healthcare industry remains a growing source of opportunity for workers, and nursing in particular has remained especially viable amidst structural change in the economy.

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Top five growing industries for those without a bachelor’s degree

It’s easy to get the impression these days that it’s close to impossible to find a good job without a bachelor’s degree, but this is not the full story.

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Trumping toward college transparency

The perfect storm is gathering around the need to increase transparency around college and careers. And in accordance with how public policy generally comes about, it might just happen.  

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Open information about college options and outcomes would help avoid buyer’s remorse

Whether it’s a used car that turned out to be a lemon or exercise equipment now gathering dust, we have all suffered buyer’s remorse. The inaugural Education Consumer Pulse survey from Strada Education Network and Gallup shows that the same kind of regret extends to college.

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Hats off to the Class of 2017. Let the Job Hunt Begin

Congratulations to the Class of 2017. Earning a Bachelor’s degree is a great step towards building a promising future. But will this year’s graduates (nearly 1.9 million) gain a foothold in today’s job market? The good news is the economy is much stronger than it has been in recent years.

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Debunking the Five Myths Behind the Pell Grant

While college enrollment continues to climb, it has grown the least for low-income students. The Pell Grant was created to open the door to college for low-income students, but we find that qualified Pell Grant recipients are being denied the opportunity of an elite college education. Some argue these students are not qualified or that

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Exploring education and employment gains among African Americans

Black History Month is an important time to reflect on the achievements of African Americans, and celebrate their profound presence in the fabric of American society. From our area of expertise, we have observed many positive trends in the education and labor market outcomes for African Americans throughout the past two decades.

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Trump’s Infrastructure Proposal Could Yield 11 Million Jobs

It is not surprising that President-elect Trump’s proposed $1 trillion in spending on infrastructure is certain to have positive employment effects in keeping with standard Keynesian theory. But, here’s the potential downside: the additional spending, in combination with tax cuts and other economic policy shifts proposed by the President-elect, could generate inflation and set the

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American higher education is far more effective at helping white students achieve their potential than black and Latino students

Since the 1990s, the number of black and Latino high school graduates who enroll in college has more than doubled. But three-quarters of that increase has been at underfunded, overcrowded open-access colleges. Meanwhile, white college enrollment has increased only at the nation’s top 500 universities. In an op-ed for the Washington Post, I argue that

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The Return of “Middle-skills” Jobs

I published an op-ed with The Hechinger Report in response to President-elect Donald Trump’s promise to bring manufacturing jobs back. It is human nature to be nostalgic for times gone by. For many, the days when a high school education was a gateway to middle-class earnings was a brighter, simpler time. But, as the op-ed

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