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Tolerance for women in politics has grown over time, especially within groups with higher levels of education. bit.ly/2nhEig4 #WomeninPolitics

test Twitter Media - Tolerance for women in politics has grown over time, especially within groups with higher levels of education. https://t.co/hmYpPhRdMa #WomeninPolitics https://t.co/wxqXmlGc85

Family income doesn’t generally predict people’s views on women in politics, as people from all income groups have shown less bias against women over time. Read more: bit.ly/2nhEig4 #WomeninPolitics

test Twitter Media - Family income doesn’t generally predict people’s views on women in politics, as people from all income groups have shown less bias against women over time. Read more: https://t.co/hmYpPhRdMa #WomeninPolitics https://t.co/bIajmwsuN2

Although women tend to win elections at the same rate as men, 13% of Americans still see women as less emotionally suited for office than men. Read more: bit.ly/2LKYSPK @thelilynews

In 1974, 55% of women over age 35 voiced bias against women in politics, compared to 34% of women age 35 and below. But by 2018, that gap had closed substantially. Read more: bit.ly/2nhEig4 #WomeninPolitics

test Twitter Media - In 1974, 55% of women over age 35 voiced bias against women in politics, compared to 34% of women age 35 and below. But by 2018, that gap had closed substantially. Read more: https://t.co/hmYpPhRdMa #WomeninPolitics https://t.co/RgnAPs4V4T

“The correlation between lower levels of bias and higher levels of education suggests that education could play a role in further reducing intolerance” against women in politics, Chief Economist Nicole Smith said. Learn more: bit.ly/2nhEig4 #WomeninPolitics

test Twitter Media - “The correlation between lower levels of bias and higher levels of education suggests that education could play a role in further reducing intolerance” against women in politics, Chief Economist Nicole Smith said. Learn more: https://t.co/hmYpPhRdMa #WomeninPolitics https://t.co/SVbaEzY3sT

If a woman is elected president in 2020, she will have had to overcome more bias than her male opponents. Read more from @byamberphillips: wapo.st/330KwAE

People of all ages today are more likely to be tolerant of women in political office than in the 1970s—the percentage of people biased has dropped about 37 points overall. Learn more: bit.ly/2nhEig4 #WomeninPolitics

test Twitter Media - People of all ages today are more likely to be tolerant of women in political office than in the 1970s—the percentage of people biased has dropped about 37 points overall. Learn more: https://t.co/hmYpPhRdMa #WomeninPolitics https://t.co/zojDHigeAD

Women “have always been in a worse labor market position,” Director of Research Jeff Strohl said. Learn more about why more women are working past retirement age: nbcnews.to/2V8pL3t @NBCNews

As the US workforce changes rapidly, community colleges are in a position to partner with employers to prepare workers to succeed. Learn more here: bit.ly/2M8mqgM @AspenHigherEd

In the 1970s, women over the age of 35 were the most likely to express bias against women in politics, compared to young women and older and younger men. But differences between those groups have shrunk with time. Read more: bit.ly/2nhEig4 #WomeninPolitics

test Twitter Media - In the 1970s, women over the age of 35 were the most likely to express bias against women in politics, compared to young women and older and younger men. But differences between those groups have shrunk with time. Read more: https://t.co/hmYpPhRdMa #WomeninPolitics https://t.co/5VHpp1IetG

For The First Time, Women Are The College-Educated Workforce Majority

In this radio interview, Meghna Chakrabarti and Stefano Kotsonis discuss women’s advancement in the workforce, and the progress that still remains to be seen, with CEW Chief Economist Nicole Smith.

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Questioning Their Fairness, A Record Number of Colleges Stop Requiring the SAT and ACT

In this article for the Hechinger Report, Alina Tugend discusses certain schools’ choice to be test-optional, and the reasons behind this decision. Tugend cites CEW report “SAT-Only Admission: How Would It Change College Campuses?”

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The only thing more expensive than going to college is not going to college.

Anthony P. Carnevale
Director and Research Professor